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World of Tanks Revises and Recommits to its Fair Play Policy

The use of certain mods won’t be tolerated.

Wargaming.net has reaffirmed its commitment to keeping the World of Tanks playing field fair by outlining a newly revised fair play policy, which prohibits the use of certain kinds of mods. The revised fair play policy was outlined through this new post on the World of Tanks website.

First off, the World of Tanks development team said they will work to be more transparent in the future regarding how they are actively combating cheaters. According to their policy, they will do so in the following ways:

  • Continuing to expand our work on anti-cheating technology solutions, while staying realistic -- we can’t promise World of Tanks will be 100% cheat-free someday. Cheaters are clever, and this battle will go on forever. What we can promise is keeping up the fight for clean competition by reducing cheating and taking action against those who don't play fair.
  • We’ve outlined a clear list of illegal mod types. Moving forward, we’ll be keeping an eye on new mods and update the list accordingly.
  • We’re also establishing a clear penalty system. This system is standard across all regions and applies to anyone found to be using prohibited software.

The penalty system mentioned above is pretty straightforward. Any player caught using an illegal mod will get a warning and a seven-day suspension. Get caught using an illegal mod a second time and you’ll be permanently banned. What counts as an illegal mod? Basically any mod which does the following:

  • Revealing the positions of enemies in a way not included in the vanilla client. Marking objects destroyed on the map and minimap in real-time by altering the display of shell flight tracers or calculating the position of enemy artillery with tracers and marking them, as well as those that keep spotted vehicles displayed, even when not aiming at them
  • Making it easier to block an enemy’s shell by indicating their exact aiming point (for example, with a laser beam)
  • Alerting you when spotted vehicles are reloading, including displaying an enemy's reloading timer
  • Auto-aim, or “aimbots” that provide more functionality than the “aim lock” in the vanilla client, specifically those that aim at the enemy's weak spots or automatically lead the aim so the offending player can focus on maneuvering their tank 
  • Enabling automatic use of non-Premium consumables
  • Aiding in finding enemies by letting you adjust the transparency of objects on the map
  • Leaving “ghosts” of enemy vehicles on the battlefield where they were last detected 
  • Any direct alteration of the physical properties, performance characteristics, or effects of any vehicle or object in the game, or otherwise subverting the game rules 

Lastly, in-battle armor viewing mods are fine for now, but Wargaming.net says it is working on implementing such a feature into World of Tanks via a future update. Once the official version of the feature is live, any mod-specific versions of the feature will be considered illegal mods.

For more on World of Tanks, be sure to check out the currently available missions for the first week of the Tanksgiving TankRewards event.

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Nate Hohl

Nate Hohl got his start in the video games journalism industry shortly after graduating college and since then he has come to find enjoyment in critiquing various forms of media (games, movies, books, etc.) and seeing how they affect our ever-developing idea of culture. If you'd like to contact him, you can do so via his email address, nate.hohl@greenlitcontent.com, or his admittedly oft-neglected Twitter account @NateHohl.