ATARI Speakerhat Beta-Tester Pack

Wargaming Continues to Tweak World of Tanks Artillery Vehicles

More changes for SPGs are incoming.

The second testing phase for World of Tanks’ upcoming 9.17.1 update has just kicked off on the game’s public test server, and Wargaming is using the opportunity to introduce new changes to Artillery class vehicles.

In a post on the World of Tanks website, Wargaming admits that Artillery vehicles (or SPGs) can cause a lot of headaches, both for those who drive them and those who have to fight them.

While Wargaming originally intended to have them to act as long-range support, SPGs are often used to perform unsportsmanlike maneuvers like base camping and forced draws instead.

To help combat the tactics above, Wargaming is testing out a change that limits the total amount of Artillery vehicles a single team can have during a match from six down to three. Along with the new Artillery vehicle limit, the following changes are also being made to SPGs on the test server as well:

  • A new stun effect that's revised and improved after last year’s Sandbox test:
    • Implements the ability to reduce the stun effect and lift it completely with consumables, which are now multi-use.
    • Added stun indicators that should help both teams quickly assess the situation and adjust their battle plans.
  • Revised ammo loads and shell and combat parameters:
    • No AP and HEAT shells for SPGs.
    • Decreased penetration and alpha damage for HE shells, while also improving their accuracy, dispersion on the move, aiming and reload time.
  • Increased blast radius and revised the damage falloff within it.
  • Introduced target area marking so that SPGs can show friendly vehicles where they aim.
  • New alternate aim for SPGs to make artillery gameplay more engaging and efficient.

Stay tuned for more coverage of the upcoming World of Tanks 9.17.1 update, and in the meantime, be sure to check out our guide on the five best Tier I tanks

spacer

Nate Hohl

Nate Hohl got his start in the video games journalism industry shortly after graduating college and since then he has come to find enjoyment in critiquing various forms of media (games, movies, books, etc.) and seeing how they affect our ever-developing idea of culture. If you'd like to contact him, you can do so via his email address, nate.hohl@greenlitcontent.com, or his admittedly oft-neglected Twitter account @NateHohl.