Wargaming Says World of Tanks' Lifespan Could Easily Last Decades

The studio also touched on the potential of in-game betting.

There’s no denying that World of Tanks has grown into a very popular free-to-play game following its initial launch. How many other games have four different Super Bowl commercials, after all? According to Wargaming, the game’s popularity isn’t expected to fade for several decades to come.

Speaking with GameSpot during a recent roundtable interview in Taipei, Wargaming’s Head of Global Competitive Gaming, Mohamed Fadl, said that he could easily see World of Tanks lasting for another 10, 20, or even 30 years. Primarily in thanks to the game’s constant stream of updates and iterations, as well as the dedication of the game’s development team:

"It competes with any game that is released this year, quality-wise, graphic-wise. Free-to-play games that are at this level, they never get old. Like a body, a heartbeat; every day, they pump fresh blood into the system." 

Later on in the interview, Fadl also addressed the issue of betting on World of Tanks eSports matches, and he certainly didn’t mince words on the subject:

"You're stupid to say betting is bad. It's a natural part of sports."

Fadl clarified his stance by saying he would love to see a future where World of Tanks players could wager in-game currency on the results of matches, but he also admitted that the prospects of gambling are still tricky waters to navigate. He also said he believes that, down the road, real-money betting could prove to be a very lucrative development for eSports as long as it’s handled correctly.

 

 

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Nate Hohl

Nate Hohl got his start in the video games journalism industry shortly after graduating college and since then he has come to find enjoyment in critiquing various forms of media (games, movies, books, etc.) and seeing how they affect our ever-developing idea of culture. If you'd like to contact him, you can do so via his email address, nate.hohl@greenlitcontent.com, or his admittedly oft-neglected Twitter account @NateHohl.