5 Things Battlefield Does Better Than Call of Duty

There are just some things that Call of Duty can’t compete with.

While other contenders may occasionally toss their hats into the ring, the gaming community will likely never know a rivalry as big as Battlefield versus Call of Duty.

These titans of the first-person shooter genre have vied for players’ attention over the course of many years now, and the competitive drive behind the companies pushing each franchise forward is about to get even more intense now that they’re both making a return to the historic annals of war (specifically, Battlefield 1 and Call of Duty: WWII).

However, as much as Battlefield and Call of Duty may try to one-up each other, there are certain elements which are undoubtedly done better in one series than the other. Below, we’ve listed five gameplay elements that have come to define the Battlefield series and have yet to be topped by Call of Duty.

Large-Scale Engagements

Call of Duty can be ideal if you’re looking for shorter multiplayer matches on a smaller scale, but if the only thing that gets your blood pumping is an epic 32v32 battle, the Battlefield series is the undisputed king of large-scale multiplayer combat.

Sure, it can get a little hectic and confusing at times when you’re in the thick of a particularly intense battle. However, there’s nothing that can compare to the feeling you get while sprinting in alongside an entire platoon of teammates while player-controlled planes dogfight overhead, and the sound of tank fire echoes in your ears.

The closest Call of Duty has ever come to large-scale warfare is the scripted encounters you’ll find in the game’s story campaigns, and they’re just not the same. 

Speaking of large-scale and Battlefield, have you seen the most recent Megalodon Easter Egg?

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Nate Hohl

Nate Hohl got his start in the video games journalism industry shortly after graduating college and since then he has come to find enjoyment in critiquing various forms of media (games, movies, books, etc.) and seeing how they affect our ever-developing idea of culture. If you'd like to contact him, you can do so via his email address, nate.hohl@greenlitcontent.com, or his admittedly oft-neglected Twitter account @NateHohl.